Transcripts

Teams

Ep. 45 Amy Edmondson on psychological safety and the future of work

...w you from your book “Teaming” (2012) and your research on psychological safety. It’s been a number of years since you’ve been working with different teams and organisations around this subject so I’m curious to know, what has your journey been with this topic and why is it important to you personally? ...more
...ould be an important phenomenon for organisations as well. So I came in to study… [and] I realised intuitively that where the learning happens is in teams because teams are doing the work. There’s some work, of course, that’s still done very much by individuals working alone, but an awful lot of it is d...more
...ortant phenomenon for organisations as well. So I came in to study… [and] I realised intuitively that where the learning happens is in teams because teams are doing the work. There’s some work, of course, that’s still done very much by individuals working alone, but an awful lot of it is done by people ...more
...it is done by people coordinating and collaborating and communicating with each other in very important, rich ways. So, I thought: “OK I’ll study how teams learn from mistakes” and what happened was I got data on mistakes, or at least experts in the medical setting had collected these data over a six-mon...more
...sing a survey instrument. And the relationship between these two data sources was kind of odd because it fundamentally was suggesting that the better teams were making more mistakes, not fewer. And I had fervently believed it would be the other way around. I then, after my surprise, started thinking abou...more
...e mistakes that do get made can be covered up — unless they lead to something awful, they can be covered up. So I started thinking, maybe the better teams aren’t making more mistakes, maybe the better teams are those where people are more willing and able to talk about mistakes. And so I didn’t have a n...more
...ss they lead to something awful, they can be covered up. So I started thinking, maybe the better teams aren’t making more mistakes, maybe the better teams are those where people are more willing and able to talk about mistakes. And so I didn’t have a name for it at that point, but I thought this was at ...more
... you’re really with the next generation of leaders, what are you finding is increasingly important in terms of building leadership capacities for the teams and organisations of the future? AE: You know I think it’s this — I don’t know what the right word is, but the kind of emotional muscle to deal with...more
... and motivation and accountability — it’s both those things, not one or the other, that really creates an environment of learning and high performing teams. And that starts with thinking about more than just myself and seeing myself as being responsible for what shows up around me. So some people listen...more
...either. AE: Exactly. We underestimate the degree to which the old model doesn’t work. And then we think: “Let’s try something new like self-managing teams, let’s try Agile — oh it didn’t work, so we go back to the old way.” But the old way wasn’t working, we just didn’t know it wasn’t working. ...more

Ep. 26 Buurtzorg and the power of self-managed teams of nurses

...ystem had become and turning patients into numbers and dehumanising them. So he started Buurtzorg, because he wanted to create a business model where teams of highly skilled nurses could control everything from their budget to their schedules, to what services they offered, all in service of helping pati...more
...elping patients lead more autonomous and fulfilling lives. So today, there are some 15,000 nurses, and they're split into around 1,000, self managing teams supported by coaches. It's a business model that's inspired people all over the world, because it's achieved incredible cost savings. And patients an...more
...ts and deciding how they were going to do things. And now the Houten team has been running for more than ten years (they've since split into multiple teams). So it's really interesting to hear all of the insights and all of what they've learned over the years about communicating, giving each other feedba...more
...join us. I think we were five? Jolanda: At first we started with four, but after a month Sheila joined. And then we were six. And now there are three teams in in Houten. Marian: And what we had to do was look for a location. I spent the money for a location. We found it together and made our home, I thin...more
... will be okay. That's what he does. And that's true. Marian: And you speak a lot with each other... Chila: Yeah, there is a good communication in the teams. Marian: We give each other feedback. Chila: That's also a problem sometimes in the self-leadership thing. Because if you cannot do that in a team, i...more
... sooner or later. So we do that. Sometimes it's difficult, but most of time we manage. And it's been ten years, so... Jolanda: But there are a lot of teams that have a lot of problems. Chila: Yes, of course, it is difficult. Marian: It's not possible that you have any one leader, everyone is the same. An...more
...Lisa Gill: Tell me about that. How does that support you, the IT system? Because I understand it's quite key to having self-managing teams at Buurtzorg. Chila: Because it makes everything very simple. You can find everything. So for one client, you can order stuff for the client or mate...more
... to buy flowers, because we lost our colleague. And we had a hard time. So she came by and she brought us that. But she also has many difficulties in teams to solve. And sometimes they are not to be solved because there are people who don't see that they don't belong there. They want to be a leader and i...more
...stant pressure to make cuts in the public sector, perhaps we'll see many more Buurtzorg-inspired examples popping up like Helen Sanderson's Wellbeing Teams in England, or Cornerstone, the social care company in Scotland. If you haven't heard those Leadermorphosis episodes, I really recommend them. I've p...more
...we associate with managers anyway. In any case, I think my interpretation, or maybe my belief in general is that there is leadership in self-managing teams, but it's a chosen kind of leadership. It's a leadership where we all step into our own authority in different ways and it's dynamic. Its leaderful, ...more

Ep. 55 Frederic Laloux with an invitation to reclaim integrity and aliveness

...of you were giving: there was a team of nurses that was obviously overstaffed and their activity had come down, so they had too many nurses and other teams were crying out for support, they needed more nurses. And when this leader asked the team that was overstaffed and said to them: “You’re obviously o...more
...at problem. For them, you are still having a role in this. But let’s actually look: the tension wasn’t with you, the CEO, the tension was between the teams that are overstaffed and understaffed. So a possible intervention is to get representatives from these teams to talk with each other. Because, yeah, ...more
...ou, the CEO, the tension was between the teams that are overstaffed and understaffed. So a possible intervention is to get representatives from these teams to talk with each other. Because, yeah, the overstaffed team can bullshit you as a leader, but they can’t bullshit the other teams, right? Like the o...more
...tatives from these teams to talk with each other. Because, yeah, the overstaffed team can bullshit you as a leader, but they can’t bullshit the other teams, right? Like the other teams will say: “You are understaffed, and we’re in pain. We need help!” And so in this case, that was all that was needed. I...more
...alk with each other. Because, yeah, the overstaffed team can bullshit you as a leader, but they can’t bullshit the other teams, right? Like the other teams will say: “You are understaffed, and we’re in pain. We need help!” And so in this case, that was all that was needed. It’s a it’s a big shift for le...more

Ep. 54 Bill Fischer and Simone Cicero on Haier and the entrepreneurial organisation

...s that we share, the books that we read… than your personal contribution. And I think you can recognise this because at the same time, you have these teams that are so engaged with their leaders. Most of most of all, of course, Zhang Ruimin — everybody respects him. But at the same time when you see an i...more
... because entrepreneurs will be able to do enterprise outside of the organisation — everybody knows that. **Now the potential of individuals and small teams is skyrocketing [compared to] to the past. And now the question is really about as an organisation and as a brand, how do we make the case for these ...more
... when you spoke about The Source, but to some extent sometimes I feel like I am one person that sometimes uses violent communication when I work with teams. And sometimes I feel like when I am forced to comply with a bureaucratic process or lots of pointless cycles of communication, I feel like a survivo...more

Ep. 33 Margaret Wheatley on leadership and Warriors for the Human Spirit

...Lisa Gill: Margaret, I'm wondering what you make of, because I mean, you mentioned at the start of our conversation, this quote about self organising teams and the productivity benefits of that, and that was in the 80s. And yet here we are in 2019. And self organising teams or self organising organisatio...more
...is quote about self organising teams and the productivity benefits of that, and that was in the 80s. And yet here we are in 2019. And self organising teams or self organising organisations are nothing new, but it seems like there's, they're sort of trendy at the moment. And there are books like reinventi...more
...g islands of sanity, and they're relating to each other in a totally different way, in a much more human way, tend to be small organisations or small teams. And it's much harder to find large examples, or large organisations. Margaret Wheatley: Yeah, that's a very important point. Yes, it doesn't happen ...more

Ep. 37 Miki Kashtan on the three shifts needed for self-managing organisations to thrive

...tems, information flow is vital and critical because if you want people to make good decisions everywhere within the organisation, if you really want teams to be able to self manage, they need to have all the information. You cannot decide for them which information they have access to or not, they need ...more